SEM Adwords campaign (Center for Cancer Research)

Managing our established SEM portfolio is already a core part of my role at the Cancer Center, including several thousand terms. As the overhaul of the Center for Cancer Research’s (CfCR) site progressed, it was crucial to support it with a targeted SEM Adwords campaign.

I began by creating keyword groups drawn from phrases used in the CfCR annual report because it includes numerous technical terms with low competition in Adwords, and high value in attracting our audience of specialist researchers to the center. I also redirected spend to follow the results of an analytics analysis of high traffic periods of the day and week. The increase in newly developed and cutting edge content on the site contributed to an improvement of the domain’s quality score, as did the addition of embedded youtube videos. I also increased the spend around the names of our Principal Investigators, to ensure we would own this traffic, as their numerous publications and conference presentations meant their reputations often preceded them.

As a result of these tactics, we were able to much more clearly tie this new online development to measurable traffic increases over the course of months around launch.

Planning and Development (What we talk about)

Initial Wireframe

Initial Wireframe

For the development of the “What we talk about (when we talk about cancer)” community site I led a group including a design agency and a web developer through multiple phases of conceptual sketches for IA, wireframing of design and layout, and functional mock-ups and staging server builds.

I managed an aggressive development timeline, which needed to match an upcoming nationwide marketing campaign across the Cancer Center.

A few months after the initial launch we began working on a phase II release, which allowed us to respond to the analytics we were collecting from our initial traffic.

For example, traffic appeared to drop-off somewhat in the early part of each monthly discussion cycle. This indicated to me that the site was perceived as having less content to engage with when only a few perspectives were visible on the homepage. As a result, I re-conceived the site’s overall architecture to work with our developer so we could create a new multi-channel format for the homepage.

WWTA phase I page in dev

WWTA Phase I in Development

 

Phase II Home Page

Phase II Carousel Development Option

Phase II Masonry Development

Phase II Masonry Development Option

WWTA final

WWTA Phase II

Content Creation (What we talk about)

A topic wordcloud, used to help review each topic for my review post

The content on the “What we talk about” community site that I developed works at the border of a traditional blog, with its content created by its contributors; an online magazine, with editorials created by me which draw conclusions from the discussions on each topic; and a forum site, open for all to comment, share and become full contributors themselves.

Creating a community space in which all these differing voices and differing levels of engagement can be accounted for began with me, as editor, establishing an initial list of topics — like “survivor”, “support” and “care” — and of the categories of community member “personas” we were seeking to engage — for example patients, physicians, caregivers, family members, administrators, etc.

I then produced a short list of initial contributors, to ensure the site launched with a balanced amount of content from each of these types of members. Prominent links to a “Participate” submission form then allowed more and more interested visitors to be added to this list (once each had agreed to a set of guidelines which ensured their posting would not violate patient privacy laws, etc).

After I have collected each set of contributions on a topic, and comments have come in from visitors to the site (each with my approval before going live, to avoid hacks or offensive posting), I create a post which collates and reflects on the ways in which the conversation has developed, to encourage further comments from visitors.

22 WWTA Survivor CODA

A review piece for the “Survivor” topic conversation

 

22 WWTA v2 everyday

The Everyday Amazing video channel

 

For the phase II release, a year after the initial launch, I added a new channel for video responses we collect from our community event van (part of the Everyday Amazing campaign). Our community now has over 50 regular contributors, and has had over 60,000 unique visitors.